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About Uterine Fibroids

UTERINE FIBROIDS
DON'T HAVE TO KEEP U DOWN

If you mention the word "fibroids" to a friend, chances are you may get a knowing nod. That's because nearly 80% of women will develop at least one within their lifetime.Start here to find out more about uterine fibroids and how they can be treated.

If you mention the word "fibroids" to a friend, chances are you may get a knowing nod. That's because nearly 80% of women will develop at least one within their lifetime.Start here to find out more about uterine fibroids and how they can be treated.

WHAT ARE THEY?

Simply put, fibroids are non-cancerous growths that form in, on, or outside the uterus. Fibroids vary in size and number, and may grow slowly or experience periods of rapid growth.

KINDS OF FIBROIDS

There are basically four major types of uterine fibroids:

Intramural fibroids, which grow within the muscular uterine wall.

Submucosal fibroids, which bulge and can extend into the uterine cavity.

Pedunculated fibroids can be inside or outside of the uterus and are attached to the uterus by a base or stalk.

Subserosal fibroids extend outside of the uterine wall.

WHO GETS THEM

Nearly 80% of women will develop fibroids by the time they reach 50.1

5 factors that could increase your probability

1. Fibroid frequency

Uterine fibroids become more common as women age, with the frequency increasing during the 30s and 40s, and up through menopause.

2. It may be the DNA

Having a family member with fibroids increases your risk. In fact, if your mother had fibroids, your risk is about 3x higher than average.2

3. Ethnicity

For reasons not yet understood, African-American women are 5x more likely to develop fibroids than white, Asian and Hispanic women.1

4. Watch the weight

Women who are overweight are at higher risk for fibroids. If you are obese, the risk can be two or three times greater than average.2

5. You are what you eat?

Next time skip the steak and maybe order the chicken. Eating a lot of red meat has been linked with a higher risk of fibroids.2

IT'S UP TO U

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References

  1. Khan AT, Shehmar M, Gupta JK. Uterine fibroids: current perspectives. Int J Women’s Health. 2014 Jan 29;6:95-114. (referenced form BSC website: http://www.bostonscientific.com/en-US/patients/health-conditions/uterine-fibroids-and-polyps.html
  2. Women’s Health.Gov . Uterine Fibroids. Accessed July, 2017. (https://www.womenshealth.gov/a-z-topics/uterine-fibroids)

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